IHSA2016 Schedule & Programme

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It is our pleasure to publish our conference programme and schedule of events for IHSA2016. Any queries may be addressed to ihsa2016@gmail.com

 

Eamonn & Committee

 

***

 

Friday, 19 February

1900                Arrival & Exhibition, Moore Institute Rooms, Ground floor, Hardiman Research Building

1930                Speeches.

Eamonn T. Gardiner, MC & Lead Organiser

Dr. Sarah-Anne Buckley, Chair, IHSA National Committee

Prof. Dáibhí Ó Crónín, History Department Welcome

Prof. Steven Ellis, Formal Opening of Conference

2000                Reception & Exhibition

2100                Social: History Quiz in College Bar.

 

Saturday, 20 February

0830-0855       Registration (€15) & Morning Coffee 1 in Arts Millennium Building.

0855-0900       Welcome/Health & Safety Briefing

0900-1015       Round A of Panels (75 mins).

1015-1035       Coffee Break 2

1035-1150       Round B of Panels (75 mins)

1150-1210       Coffee Break 3

1210-1325       Round C of Panels (75 mins)

1325-1335       Move from Arts Millennium to College Bar (10 mins)

1335-1420       Lunch (College Bar)/AGM (AM Building) (45 mins)

1420-1430       Move from College Bar to Arts Millennium for Workshop.

1430-1530       Workshop: Research Funding Opportunities (60 mins).

1530-1535       Leave Workshop and move to rooms for Round D

1535-1650       Round D of Panels (75 mins)

1650-1710       Coffee Break 4

1710-1825       Round E of Panels (75 mins)

1825-1835       Closing remarks and final reminder dinner timings & Sunday programme.

1835-2030       Arrive at Harbour Hotel for Pre-Meal Reception

2030-2200       Dinner (Prosecco Reception & 5 Courses, €25)

2200-2245       Eamonn T. Gardiner MC.

Introduction by Dr. Mary Harris, Senior Lecturer, NUI Galway & ‘A Nation Rising’, 1916 Commemorative Programme Coordinator

After-Dinner Speaker: Professor Emeritus Nicholas Canny, NUIG. http://erc.europa.eu/organisation/canny-nicholas

2245-2315       Prize giving

2315+              Post Dinner & Move to other venues.

 

 

Sunday, 21 February

1200-1300       Walking Tour of Galway.

Early Modern & Revolutionary Galway

 

Round A 09:00-10:15

 

(A1) Narratives from Christian Ireland

            Chair: Kieran Hoare

  • Ossory on the Eve of the Reformation
    • Bernadette O’Brien, NUI Galway

 

  • Brigit and pregnant women: discussion on the issue
    • Dmitrii Glass, Mary Immaculate College

 

  • Is there a Problem of Saint Patrick? If so, is there a solution?
    • Nathan Dunphy, NUI Galway

 

 

(A2) Twentieth-Century Philosophical, Logical and Cultural Approaches

Chair: Dr. Tomás Finn

  • Catholic anti-communism, the Cold War, and peace and nuclear disarmament campaigns in Ireland.
    • Gerard Madden, NUI Galway

 

  • ‘A pioneering historian of ideas: Robert Blakey, and the birth of a disciplinary genre.’
    • Stuart Mathieson, Queens University Belfast

 

  • AUDIO-VISUAL: Letting the Sources Speak: Title: ‘Gainsbourg: A ‘Serge’ of Sexual Content in French Popular Culture, 1966-1991’
    • Robert Flatley, NUI Galway

 

(A3) Race in the Americas from the Colonies to the Civil War

Chair: Dr. Enrico Dal Lago

  • “A Rich Man’s Government… A Poor Man’s Fight”: Class Conflict and Unionist Dissent in the Confederate South.
    • Jordan Markey, NUI Galway

 

  • ‘Bound to Serve’ White indentured Labour in Colonial America.
    • Leanne McMullan, University of Ulster

 

  • Religion, Racism, & Perfidious Albion: Irish Soldiers in the Union Army during the American Civil War.
    • Florry O’Driscoll, NUI Galway

 

(A4) Shades of Roman Catholicism in Ireland, 1844-1950

Chair: Dr. Roisín Healy

  • St Vincent de Paul in Dublin, 1844-1918: Friends of the Poor or Self-Serving Religious Zealots?
    • Bernadette O’Connell, NUI Galway

 

  • The Roman Catholic Church in Sligo during the Great War.
    • Simone Hickey, St. Angela’s College

 

  • The Irish Catholic Missionary Experience in the Twentieth Century
    • Kate Brophy, Trinity College Dublin

 

(A5) Nineteenth-Century Irish Nationalism

            Chair: Dr. Carmel Connolly

  • Alternative solutions to the intractable Irish question, 1892-1902.
    • Tony King, NUI Galway

 

  • The Persistence of Nationalist and Anti-State Sentiment in Ulster, 1848-1867
    • Kerron Ó Luain, Independent Scholar

 

  • The Road from Kilmorna: Canon Sheehan, Fenianism, and prefiguring 1916
    • John O’Donovan, University College Cork

 

Round B 10:35-11:50

 

(B1) Warfighting as an aid to Civil Governance.

Chair: Dr. Pádraig Lenihan

  • ‘Pax Romana’: The true triumph of the Roman people
    • George Baldry, NUI Galway

 

  • ‘To defend those who have no swords’: The birth of Crusading as theological disruption and political evolution
    • Declan Mills, University of Limerick

 

  • Between Success and Surrender: Thomas Wentworth, Lord Deputy of Ireland, 1633- 1639.
    • Marie Sophie Hingst, Trinity College Dublin

 

 

(B2) A Postmodern History of Human Rights and Terrorism

            Chair: Dr. Kevin O’Sullivan

  • Operation Allied Force, Humanitarian Intervention and the Kosovo war of 1999Cian Moran, NUI Galway

 

  • Refugees and Humanitarian Aid as Weapons of War: Cambodia and Rwanda.
    • John O’Donnell, NUI Galway

 

  • Bullets, Bombs & Blood: Chechen Terrorist Tactics and Beyond
    • Francesco Conti, NUI Galway

 

(B3) The Evolution of Warfare during Irish Revolution, 1916-1923

Chair: Dr. Conor McNamara

  • ‘Scattered, Ambushed and Laid Out’: War and Counterinsurgency in North Galway 1919-1921
    • Eamonn T. Gardiner, NUI Galway

 

  • The importance of Dublin during the Irish War of Independence
    • Thomas Tormey, Trinity College Dublin

 

  • ‘A Cycle of Violence’: Analysing the Role of the Bicycle during the Irish Revolutionary Period 1916-1923
    • Bryan Treanor, St. Patrick’s College of Education/DCU

 

(B4) Re-evaluating Education: Irish and American examples

Chair: Dr. Jackie Uí Chionna

  • The post-primary school in Ireland, 1940-58: A case study of the Presentation Order
    • Catriona Delaney, University of Limerick

 

  • “To Educate Themselves”: African American Teachers in North Carolina’s Schools for the Freed People, 1861-1876
    • Anne Marie Brosnan, Mary Immaculate College

 

  • Looking To The Past To Build For The Future’: State-Building, Curricular Developments, And School History In Post-Independence Ireland, 1924-69
    • Colm MacGearilt, Trinity College Dublin

 

(B5) Changes in Irish Political Landscape, 1913-1923

Chair: Dr. Joe Regan

  • The role of Lord Decies, Press Censor for the British Administration in Ireland, 1916-19, or how I learned to stop worrying and love the Censor
    • Alan McCarthy, University College Cork

 

  • Assessing the contributing factors leading to Sinn Fein’s victory in the 1918 General Election
    • Patrick Mulcahy, University of Limerick

 

  • ‘Constitutional Nationalists still have considerable strength’? Examining the views of Home Rule activists 1919-21
    • Martin O’Donoghue, NUI Galway

 

Round C 12:10-13:25

 

(C1) ‘Mythology and Máthair Chíche’ – Revisiting Old-Irish Texts and Stories

Chair: Dr. Chris Doyle

  • Gaelic Revival and the Ulster and Ossian Cycles: National heroes in Cúchulainn and Fionn Mac Cumhail
    • Erin Rae-MacKinney, University of Ulster

 

  • An mháthair chíche sa Mheánaois in Éirinn
    • Aogán Ó hIarlaithe, NUI Galway

 

(C2) Children and Social culture; Ideas of Youth.

Chair: Dr. Sarah-Anne Buckley

  • ‘They go to England to preserve their Secret”: The emigration and assistance of the Irish unmarried mother in Britain 1926-1952.’
    • Lorraine Grimes, NUI Galway

 

  • ‘Changeling Children in Nineteenth Century Ireland
    • Jodie Shevlin, University of Ulster

 

  • “They called them Edelweiss Pirates, where they Blossomed, Resistance Grew?!”- The Edelweiss Pirates as an Example of Oppositional Youth Movements in Nazi Germany.
    • Annika Stendebach, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz

 

(C3) Complexities of the Anglo-Irish Interdependency

Chair: Dr. Andrew Holmes

  • Irish Catholics within the British Officer Corps: 1829-1899
    • Mark Scannell, NUI Galway

 

  • ‘Help Wanted! No Irish need apply’. The effects of British prejudice and discrimination against Irish migrants in the early- to mid-20th
    • Finian J.E. Halligan, University of Warwick

 

  • Irish Immigrant Entrepreneurs in the Post-war Reconstruction of London
    • Michael B. Mulvey, Maynooth University

 

(C4) ‘Fight for Ireland and no other land’: Revolutionary Labour History

Chair: Dr. John Cunningham

  • The Age of Larkinism: ‘A Divine Mission’ (1907-1914).
    • Stephen Deyarmin, NUI Galway

 

  • The Drapers’ Revolution, 1913-1924.
    • Breandán Ó’Conchúir, NUI Galway

 

  • The Irish Citizen Army and the Anglo-Irish War.
    • Jeffrey Leddin, University of Limerick

 

(C5) The Great War Generation, 1890-1924

Chair: Dr. Kyle Hughes

  • The Master of Mystery and the Great War: the spy novels of William Le Queux, 1914 – 1918
    • Jonathan Best, Queens University Belfast

 

  • The best of enemies: South Africa and the Germans of South West Africa, 1914-1924
    • Gavan Duffy, NUI Galway

 

  • 1916: Tolkien at the Battle of the Somme
    • Sandra Hartl, University of Bamberg

 

Round D 15:35-16:50

 

(D1) Lydon’s ‘Middle Nation’- The Old-English and the Irish in the later medieval period

Chair: Dr. Kim Lo Prete

  • The Bruce invasion of Ireland, 1315-1318
    • Eoghan Keane, Trinity College Dublin

 

  • The Early Years of Gearóid Iarla, Third Earl of Desmond
    • Dónal Ó Catháin, NUI Galway

 

(D2) Gender, Class & Conflict

Chair: Dr. Paul O’Brien

  • Post-war cinema-going and working-class communities: a case study of the Holyland, Belfast, 1945-1962.
    • Sam Manning, Queens University Belfast

 

  • Experiences of women in the Anglo-Irish War
    • Thomas Earls Fitzgerald, Trinity College Dublin

 

  • POSTER: Emyr Estyn Evans : The Formative Years
    • Lauren Ferguson, Queens University Belfast

 

 (D3) Histories of Healthcare

Chair: Dr. Ciarán McCabe

  • ‘Admitting the Mad’: Insanity in the Ulster District Lunatic Asylums, 1845-1914.
    • Seaneen Larkin, University of Ulster

 

  • ‘Where one journey ends, the next begins…’ Dr. Thomas Raleigh Phayer, Medical Doctor, Apothecarist, Surgeon and Physician of Newcastle West, Co. Limerick.
    • John Phayer, Independent Researcher

 

  • Historical development and economic impact of obesity
    • Cillian Moran, NUI Galway

 

(D4) Religious Communities in the Nineteenth-Century

            Chair: Dr. Alison Forrestal

  • Truth and Error: Anti-Catholicism and the Free Church of Scotland in the mid-nineteenth century
    • Ryan Mallon, Queens University Belfast

 

  • ‘We shall not shrink, where Justice demands it..’ Belfast Quaker influence on British Abolitionism utilising ‘The Irish Friend’, 1838-1842
    • Krysta Beggs-McCormick, University of Ulster

 

  • Women Religious in Nineteenth Century Ireland: Personal and Corporate Identity
    • Bridget Harrison, Queens University Belfast

 

(D5) Irish Finance and Taxation, Pre and Post-Independence, 1916-1931

Chair: TBC

  • Shadow of a Taxman: How, and by whom, was the Republican Movement Financed in the Irish War of Independence?
    • Robin Adams, St. Peter’s College, Oxford

 

  • Art Ó Briain and the Irish National Relief Fund of London, 1916-1919.
    • Mary MacDiarmada, St. Patrick’s College of Education/DCU

 

  • Foreign versus Fashion: Chinese bacon and Parisian clothing in the Irish Free State
    • John Porter, Trinity College Dublin

 

(D6) Intergenerational effects of war

Chair: Dr. Cathal Smith

  • ‘Migrant, Refugee, Terrorist’ Asylum in Interwar France: The Case of the Spanish Exiles (1934-35)
    • Eoghan Moran, Queen Mary University, London

 

  • The children of war and revolution?: Influence of the First World War, the 1916 Rising and WoI upon the Irish volunteers who joined the British forces WW2.
    • Joseph Quinn, Trinity College Dublin

 

Round E 17:10-18:25

 

(E1) Politics and Power in Tudor Ireland

Chair: Prof. Steven Ellis

  • ‘…to restrayne the Englishe from soche evells as Irishe infeccion poysoned theim with.’ Creating a pathology of Irishness during the ‘Tudor Conquest of Ireland’.
    • Carla Lessing, NUI Galway

 

  • The best of times, the worst of times – the thoughts of a Tudor administrator in Ireland
    • Deirdre Fennell, NUI Galway

 

(E2) The Lives of Ulster Women, 1890-1930

Chair: Dr. Caitriona Clear

  • ‘Obscure Lives’: A Biographical Portrait of Queen’s District Nurses in Ireland (1890-1907)
    • Joyce Ní Ghiobuin, Trinity College Dublin

 

  • ‘With fingers weary and worn’?: Factory legislation and the treatment of women workers in the Londonderry shirt industry, c.1860-1920
    • Chelsea Brownlee, Queens University Belfast

 

  • Devolution, Northern Ireland, and the Illegitimate Children (Affiliation Orders) Act, 1924.
    • Alex Tierney, Trinity College Dublin

 

(E3) History from Outside: Fringe histories during the Irish Revolution

 

Chair: Dr. Mary Harris

 

  • The Colonel, the Canadian and the Cork man: The  Irish Diplomatic Mission to South Africa in 1921
    • Madeline O’Neill, NUI Galway

 

  • Ireland’s forgotten diplomats: Nancy Wyse Power and Máire O’Brien’s quest for obtaining recognition for independent Ireland, 1919-23.
    • Ann Marie O’Brien, University of Limerick

 

  • ‘“Who were the Shoneens?”: Irish militant nationalists and association football, 1913-1923.
    • Aaron Ó Maonaigh, St. Patrick’s College of Education/DCU

 

(E4) The changing face of the Irish Economy

            Chair: Prof. Ciarán Ó hÓgartaigh

  • After the Expiry Date: Wills of the lesser gentry in east Mayo, 1760-1880.
    • Olivia Martin, NUI Galway

 

  • Nineteenth century urban Irish artisans and protectionism: a study of popular economic nationalism.
    • John McGrath, Mary Immaculate College

 

  • ‘Closing Cowtown’ – The demise of the Dublin Cattle Market.
    • Declan O’Brien, Mary Immaculate College

 

(E5) Anglo-Irish Relations in the Post-Independence period

Chair: Dr. Séan Ó Duibhir

  • ‘A bit of news, which you may, or may not, care to use’: the influence of the Beaverbrook-Healy relationship on the construction of Ireland in the British press post-independence.
    • Elspeth Payne, Trinity College Dublin

 

  • ‘Anglo-Irish Relations during The Falkland’s War of 1982.’
    • Fiona McKelvey, University of Ulster

 

  • “A peace of sorts”: Changing expectations in Northern Ireland after the Belfast Agreement, 1998-2007.
    • Eamonn McNamara, Australian National University

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