IHSA 2016 – Photographs

Dear Colleagues,

 

Apologies the delay in posting our images of the conference weekend, but things have been hectic! Please find below our images taken by our fantastic Official Photographer, Katya Radovanova!

 

 

Kind regards,

 

 

 

 

Eamonn & Team

 

 

Conference Workshop: ‘Funding Opportunities for Historical Research’

The organising committee of IHSA 2016 are delighted to announce that the conference will play host to a workshop on ‘Funding Opportunities for Historical Research.’ The workshop will take the format of a panel discussion, chaired by the eminently capable and esteemed Professor Dan Carey, of the Moore Institute, NUI Galway. Panelists will include Professor Marie-Louise Coolahan, NUI Galway, Dr. Sarah-Anne Buckley, NUI Galway and a representative from the NUI Galway Research Office.

Dan Carey

Prof. Carey, prior to assuming the mantle of Director of the Moore Institute (NUIG’s Humanities and Social Sciences Research hub) has a long record of research in his own fields of English literature in the early modern period, relationship between travel and natural history, intellectual history including Locke, the Scottish Enlightenment and philosophies of human nature, the history and philosophy of money in the Enlightenment.

He is an alum of of McGill University, Trinity College Dublin, and Oxford University. His book on Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson: Contesting Diversity in the Enlightenment and Beyond appeared with Cambridge University Press in 2006. He has previously been awarded a Senior Research Fellowship by the Irish Research Council for Humanities & Social Sciences for his project: A Critical Edition of Richard Hakluyt’s Principal Navigations (1598-1600).’

 

Marie-Louise Coolahan

 

Prof. Coolahan is a graduate of Trinity College Dublin (BA 1994), Oxford University (MPhil 1996), and Nottingham Trent University (PhD 2000). Previously she has received a doctoral bursary to work with the AHRB-funded Perdita Project (researching sixteenth-seventeenth century women’s manuscript compilations.

She has been awarded a research fellowship at the Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington D.C., and elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (UK) in 2012. Recently, she secured a European Research Council Consolidator Grant (Principal Investigator) for her project, RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing, 1550-1700 (July 2014-June 2019).

 

 

Sarah-Anne Buckley

Dr. Buckley works in the Department of History, NUI Galway. Her research interests include the history of child welfare/child protection, gender history, history of family and the history of medicine. She has published on the history of the Haematology Association of Ireland, The Cruelty Man: Child Welfare, the NSPCC and the State in Ireland, 1889-1956.

Recently she co-edited a volume on gender in Ireland with Dr Rebecca Barr and Dr Laura Kelly which was published in 2015. In 2015 she was awarded a Charlemont Scholarship for research on Irish foundlings in London.

In order to increase audience participation in this event, we’re inviting your questions in advance. To join the conversation, go to @ihsa2016 on Twitter and add the hashtag #workshop and your question, or Facebook and post your question in the Workshop thread. Help shape the debate!

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Images & Information from: www.newyorkirisharts.com, www.nuigalway.ie, www.ria.ieFulbright Ireland.

‘Dr. Margaret Ó hÓgartaigh’ memorial Prize for the History of Medicine and Society

 

Dear Colleagues, the organising committee of the Irish History Students’ Association, Annual Conference for Galway 2016 are pleased to announce that in addition to the prizes being offered by the IHSA, the Galway organising committee have secured additional external sponsorship from Cambridge Scholars Publishing for two additional, once-off, prizes for 2016.

Students are sometimes asked to think about which figure from history they would most like to invite to a dinner party. Dr. Margaret Ó hÓgartaigh, nee Whelan, has to be up there with the absolute best. A native of Killaloe, Co. Clare, Margaret first came to Galway in 1985, where she threw herself into An Cumann Staire, serving in a multitude of offices, including chair of the IHSA. She was also quite an astute businesswoman, boosting sales of the Cumann’s Journal Stair with a free pint of Guinness! But there was also a serious and earnest side to Margaret. She was tireless in her research, even working on her latest book while she was unwell. She helped open new avenues of historical research into areas which this prize hopes to broadly emulate for a new generation of scholars to take up her mantle. With her intrepid zeal for life and for her work and family, we are proud to be associated with and to be able to offer this prize in her memory.

Kathleen Lynn launch, c.2006.

The prize will be awarded to the best paper in any one (or multiple) category listed on the following sheet. They will be independently judged PRIOR to being given, which means that all interested parties must pre-submit their paper (or latest working draft), no later than the 19th January 2016, i.e. one calendar month before the conference.

Further details are listed below on each particular prize. The adjudicator’s decision is final and no discussion whatsoever will be entered into. Prizes will be awarded at the Conference Dinner (Harbour Hotel, Galway, 20 February, 8pm). All entrants must attend the conference AND deliver their papers. Failure to attend and/or speak is grounds for disqualification.

 

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Dr. Margaret Ó hÓgartaigh memorial Prize

  • This prize has been kindly sponsored by Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
  • Period which the papers/posters/AV/artefact presentations deal with must deal with one or more aspects of the History of Medicine and Society, though some leeway is allowed. General areas to be considered include, but are not limited to:
    • Medicine
    • Gender and/or Sex
    • Education
    • Irishwomen
    • Society and/or Religion
    • Sport & Athletics
    • History of the IHSA/IUHSA/Student Historical Societies
  • All interested papers must be pre-submitted (or the latest working draft), no later than the 19th January, i.e. one calendar month before the conference.
  • Once submitted that is the paper which will be judged. No further submissions/alterations will be allowed.
  • Any supporting documentation (such as an audio-visual or image based element) must be submitted also.

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Committee Profile: Jordan Markey

Jordan Markey, Auditor An Cumann Staire. (c) Katya Radovanova.
Jordan Markey, Auditor An Cumann Staire. (c) Katya Radovanova.

Name: Jordan Markey

Committee Position: Auditor, An Cumann Staire

 

Course: In am in my final year BA, after finishing a previous undergraduate course in computing. I plan to undertake a MLitt next year.

 

Age: 23

 

Areas of Interest: My interests mainly lie in modern United States history, particularly domestic and foreign policy, Manifest Destiny, terrorism, and Civil War and Reconstruction.

Upcoming IHSA Paper: My 2016 paper will be something along the lines of the rise and fall of the Freedmen’s Bureau in the US after the Civil War, and what questions and issues it raises for contemporary and future America.

Was 2015 your first IHSA Conference? Yes. My first attending and presenting.

 

Jordan at IHSA 2015, UL. (c) Katya Radovanova
Jordan speaking at IHSA 2015, UL. (c) Katya Radovanova

What attracted you to the IHSA & An Cumann Staire? I wanted to meet like-minded and enthusiastic people with a passion for history. It was An Cumann Staire that realised that both academically and socially, and I swiftly got involved. As an annual tradition for the society to send a delegation to IHSA, I attended last year. I also went to learn what it was like to present at an academic conference, while also networking in a relaxed atmosphere.

 

Best memory of the conferences? Delivering my first conference paper in 2015 to a warm reception.

 

What are you looking forward to most about Galway 2016? Upholding the academic reputation that Galway has for history, while also catching some interesting papers and networking with historians of the future.

 

IHSA 2016 Annual Conference, Call for Papers

Fishka.Logo.Photo

The Irish History Students’ Association is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for its Annual Conference, which will take place in NUI Galway from 19–21 February, 2016.

Proposals are invited for papers (in English or Irish) from both undergraduates and postgraduates in Ireland, on any historical topic or period and from those studying Irish history abroad. Abstracts of no more than 250 words for 20 minute research papers (approx. 2,500–3,000 words in length) should be submitted, along with a short personal biography of no more than 100 words.

ihsa.map

Poster presentations are also invited. Posters should be A0 in size and may encompass any style or theme, similar to the criteria for written papers. Presenters should be prepared to speak for up to 10 minutes regarding their posters, with or without an accompanying short paper. Further details will be provided on request by emailing
ihsa2016@gmail.com

As usual there is no specific conference theme. However, given the various commemorative events which are expected to take place on the island of Ireland in 2016, papers are also invited on (but certainly not limited to) issues which fall broadly within the theme of the Decade of Centenaries (1912-1923).

Eyre Square
Eyre Square – Galway, the ‘City of the Tribes’, is steeped in Medieval & Modern History

All proposals should be submitted by email to ihsa2016@gmail.com no later than Friday 11 December, 2015. Abstracts and biographies should be submitted in the form of a word document attached to the email and should include: Full Name, Institutional Affiliation (if any), and Paper/Poster Title.

For more information please see:
IHSA 2016 Facebook and Academia.edu – IHSA2016

This event has been kindly sponsored by Bank of Irelandboi1

Past Speaker Bio: Robert S. Rock, University of Hertfordshire/British Museum

RobertRock.Herts.IHSA2015

Name: Robert S. Rock

Institution: University of Hertfordshire/British Museum

Course: M. Phil. (formerly PhD)

Age: 25

Subject Area/Thesis Title/Paper you gave: Eighteenth Century Social History of Criminal London

Was 2015 your first IHSA Conference? No; I spoke at Queens University Belfast in 2013 and Mary Immaculate College in 2014.

What attracted you to the IHSA Conferences? As a young academic, I felt the need to start attending academic conferences and have my voice heard. This was naturally coupled with the support of my friends and colleagues at NUIG.

Best memory of the conferences? Giving my first academic paper at a great IHSA in Galway 2012.

What are you looking forward to most about Galway 2016? I won’t be involved in the academic aspect when the Galway conference rolls round, so I’m looking forward to sitting back and listening and meeting people there!

 

Past Speaker Bio: Jodie Shevlin, University of Ulster

Jodie.UU.01.09.2015

Name:  Jodie Shevlin

Institution: University of Ulster

Course: PhD

Age: 26

Subject Area/Thesis Title/Paper you gave:

I’m interested in 19th Century Irish social & cultural history/ Religion/Crime/Witchcraft/ Supernatural/Folklore.

Was 2015 your first IHSA Conference? No, 2013 Queens University was my first time.

What attracted you to the IHSA Conferences?

Robert Rock (his paper on Witchcraft to be more specific 🙂 ) and the opportunity to network.

Best memory of the conferences?

I made a joke about the amount of pigeons at one point during Prof. Sean Connolly’s Walking History Tour of Belfast (resembling a scene from ‘Home Alone’). Cara Hanley laughed; we got talking and found out we had the same supervisor. Friend made for life!

Worst memory of the conferences?

I’ve had no bad memories or experiences with IHSA conferences. That having been said, I did learn the hard way that it’s not an absolute requirement to bring your own wine, in a plastic water bottle and refill your glass under the table during the conference dinner…

What are you looking forward to most about Galway 2016?

Ceol agus Craic! I expect to be ‘Takin’ a whirl, ‘Round the Salthill Prom, with a Galway Guy!’ But seriously, I’m really looking forward to IHSA 2016 because I couldn’t attend last year and heard that I missed some awesome papers, like Aaron O Maonaigh’s on the Thompson Sub-machine Gun. I can’t wait to see my old buddies and make new ones, like every year. I’m also really looking forward to giving my first IHSA paper!

Anything else you’d like to add? The atmosphere of an IHSA conference in my experience has always been welcoming and friendly to speakers and listeners alike, I’d heartily recommend it to any student.

Past Speaker Bio: Aaron Ó Maonaigh, St. Patrick’s College, Dublin

Aaron ó Mainaoigh, St. Patrick's College, Dublin

Name: Aaron Ó Maonaigh

Institution: Coláiste Phádraig, Droim Conrach.

Course: B.A Humanities (English and History)

Age: 28

Subject Area/Paper: Military History of the Irish Revolution/’The Thompson Submachine Gun and the Irish War of Independence‘.

Last year was my second IHSA and my first conference at which I delivered a paper. I was attracted to the opportunity that the IHSA affords undergraduates who wish to present papers based on their own research.

Best memory: Delivering my very first conference paper to a wonderfully receptive audience.

Worst memory: Delivering said paper after a night out on the town in Limerick!

What am I looking forward to at IHSA 2016: Delivering another paper to what is shaping up to be a fantastic conference @ihsa2016, coupled with the fact that conference is being held in one of the most beautiful parts of Éire.

Anything else to add: For any prospective first-time speakers. The environment at the IHSA is a very friendly and welcoming one, you will meet contacts with whom you will find you share many common interests that often bring many prospective projects to fruition. My advice is to enjoy yourself and the weekend.

Beir bua a chairde!

Free Education, isn’t…

The Mamas & the Papas

Do you remember that song from the 1965, ‘California Dreamin [on a Winter’s Day]’, by The Mama’s & The Papas? It was a great hit at the time and has shown true resilience over the intervening decades. As a matter of fact I had started to write this entry in a very different fashion and he lyric entered my head and I had to listen to it….and then the entire timbre of the article changed before my eyes! Anyway I digress, but seriously, please take a listen to some great 60’s counter-culture! California Dreamin. I have a link and although tentative, I think its relevant.

As a PhD student (final year, thank the gods!), take it from me; money does not fall from the sky like autumnal leaves. Even as the aforementioned song describes “All the leaves are brown/And the Sky is grey”, one must marvel at the metaphorical sight of all those fivers and tenners slowly spiralling down to form a blanket on the ground. Wouldn’t it be a great thing, if the simple things in life were, if not free, then at least valued and funded appropriately?

www.123rf.com
http://www.123rf.com

As a conference organiser seeking funding, I can tell you money does most definitely not fall in such a fashion! But yet again at CAO time we have a talking head pop up to tell us about this great knowledge economy we have here and how our third level institutions are so well funded, etc, etc. We  as anyone in academia knows, they’re not. I heard from a colleague a few years back that a leading Irish Third Level department had to sell some of their PHOTOCOPIERS to make ends meet after a budgetary shortfall.

The Royal Irish Academy (hat tip for kudos), have come out with a sensible position/advice paper aimed toward central government and perhaps as a broader conversation starter also in the Irish Third Level sector regarding not just the perennially raw topic of funding, but also the more pressing topic of student funding. We all remember the terrible hardship caused in 2012/2013/2014 by the disastrous SUSI website for online grants “processing.” Part-time (and personally I have MASSIVE issues with that misleading and pejorative term) students are being persecuted by the Irish education system and successive administrations for not being good little drones and entering into courses in the desire full-time fashion with other Secondary School graduates.

Professor Daly (to the right of An tUachtarán, Michael D. Higgins). www.ul.ie
Professor Daly (to the right of An tUachtarán, Michael D. Higgins). http://www.ul.ie

Grants are being withheld from people who, lets face it here, are trying to better themselves. Professor Mary Daly succinctly presents the case of the

“…bank official working full-time on €25,000 a year is being charged fees to study in the evenings, while the child of the bank’s CEO is entitled to the free fees scheme to study during the day?”

The Higher Education Authority has reported a significant drop of 9% of students embarking on a PhD and a 2% drop in those engaging with 3rd Level as a Mature Student in recent years. With all the Brouhaha (yes, I dropped the B-Bomb!) in recent years about the need for ‘re-training’ and ‘internships’, it should come as a significant surprise that during the same period Postgraduate students have had their access to maintenance grants significantly undermined by SUSI and the Irish government, the body pushing this great ‘knowledge economy.’

University rankings. Generally speaking, those who excel are those with greater funding. Irish Independent
University rankings. Generally speaking, those who excel are those with greater funding. Irish Independent

Now in ‘post-crisis’ Ireland (another massive bone of contention btw), with everything rising but the dead, students are faced with increased accommodation costs, not only in Dublin, but also throughout the country as a whole. So people will just commute from home or a cheaper place to live? Also on the rise is petrol/diesel, parking, public transportation fares. Fees are also continually and incrementally rising, with increases being used to offset declining central government funding. Those claiming that grants are quite generous are living in cloud cuckoo land; wages rose during the Great War also, but inflation effectively destroyed those paltry increases! Free Education, isn’t, basically.

www.independent.ie
http://www.independent.ie

There’s a massive disconnect between what the government want (and not just this one wither, in case I’m accused of Fine Gael/Labour bashing…though Ruairí Quinn, the former ‘Hypocrite-in-Chief’, did their credibility few favours) and what they’re willing to invest in. Perhaps as the RIA suggests a new model of student support should be entered into? I’m not blind to the needs of universities or IT’s to investment and upgrading of facilities and infrastructure, but something has to give here; many have an aging (and expensive) building stock, which were expanded during the 1960’s and 70’s and need modernising. And its probably going to be parents and students who will have to give in. A model which is used at the national and international level might be worth considering; a bond issue. If colleges were to issue a long term bond, which would accrue with profits generated over a thirty year period, it might provide for some financial stability and guaranteed income. Some profits from these campus based start-ups and spin-offs we hear so much about, could be channelled into this area, etc.

Taking (and breaking) the Pledge
Taking (and breaking) the Pledge

As a conclusion, we as a Third Level community must acknowledge that the system is at present not effective. it is creaking along and certainly not operating at the peak efficiency, which is desired. Unfortunately, one must wait and see are there any in the sector, especially the national parliament, who posses the ability to engineer and herald such dramatic and much needed change.